As I’m sure most visitors to this blog already know, Sparta Prague are the most successful club from the Czech Republic. I visited their Stadion Letna–I use the colloquial name since sponsorships are ever-changing in the age of industrial football–in the summer of 2010. The club’s history is rich, having been formed over 120 years ago in 1893, and as such a visit to the Letna takes the traveling fan off the beaten path.

While the friends I visited Prague with decided to while away their afternoon in the city center with the beautiful girls, I decided to go on my own adventure to the Letna. Rest assured, it is a valuable trip for the intrepid football fan because it takes one off the beaten tourist path of the Charles Bridge and Prague Castle (although both are essential spots to visit).

High above the Vltava river is a large park with inviting beer gardens, and after a few pints and a relaxing stroll through the park’s pathways one will find themselves squarely in an Eastern European scene. After overcoming the shock of the drab communist-era tenements, which are in stark contrast to the tourist-centric Old Town Center, one will come across Sparta’s ground, the Letna. Despite being built in 1969, its renovations have made it undeniably modern with a capacity of 19,784, and–I’m sure–would make a great place to take in a match. Hopefully, i’ll make it back for the Sparta-Slavia fixture in order to get a shirt from both sides–for my Sparta shirt, a vintage piece picked up from the internet, please see this page. In the meantime, my pictures from a summer’s day will have to suffice:

Communist-era Tenements Are In Stark Contrast to the Old Town’s Old World Charms:

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I’ve made it to the Generali Arena:

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What would Ultra Graffiti be without the obligatory “ACAB”?:

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I don’t know what it means, but I like it:

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Generali Arena or Toyota Arena? I prefer the pre-industrial football name–Letna:

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The Old Town Is in the background, but at least I know I’m still in Eastern Europe:

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